Detachment of New Jersey

Legislative

Patrick Gallagher

Updated December 2, 2022

Thomas G. Deal, Chairman

National Legislative Commission

Sons of The American Legion

1434 Clayton Street

Perryville, Md. 21903

E-mail: tom.deal@verizon.net Cell: (443) 206-0402

January 4, 2022

To: All Members of The Sons of The American Legion

Re: Wreath Laying Ceremonies, Washington DC, Sunday February 26, 2023

The Sons of The American Legion National Commander Chris Carlton on Sunday February 26, 2023, will be

placing a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery at 11:15 pm. From there we will

be stopping at the Vietnam Wall Memorial, then a final stop at World War II Memorial. This notification will allow

members of The American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, Sons of The American Legion, American Legion

Riders friends and families to attend and show our respect for the sacrifices made by our Nation’s military in the

defense of liberty and freedom.

In the previous years, Detachments have placed their wreaths at various areas in Washington DC. The National

Organization received from the American Legion Family and many tourists have made positive statements seeing the

wreaths from Detachments placed around the Washington area. We feel that this is a very positive outcome and are

recommending any Detachment wishing to lay a wreath or have a wreath laid for them in the Washington area to

continue.

Representatives from each Detachment or their designee would be able to choose a location to lay their wreath,

some placed wreaths at areas that the bus rented by the National Organization stopped to do ceremonies, and others at a

later time placed wreaths in various locations around Washington DC. I will be ordering wreaths for National

Commander Chris Carlton, and in order to have the wreaths appear in conformity, we will order wreaths as a group for

each Detachment or Squadron; the wreaths last year cost each Detachment $150 and remain the same for this year.

I will provide each Detachment a separate receipt from the florist shop for each wreath ordered, if requested.

Checks should be made payable to Thomas Deal and mailed to my home address. Below is an order form. Please send

back only the bottom portion of this letter and keep the top section for your records. I must receive the completed

order form and payment by February 4, 2023, in order to ensure your Detachment has a wreath ordered. (No

payment, no wreath, no group rate!)

At Arlington National cemetery we will be going to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The tomb is a walk

uphill from the visitor center and you may walk or take the tram. The tram fee purchased that day is $17.95. This year

we are again adding an offer to purchase your tickets for the Tram ride to the Tomb of The Unknown Soldier at

Arlington National Cemetery in advance to speed up the process of getting to the Tomb of The Unknown Soldier

quicker. Group rate for the Tram ride is $13.95 each. If you would like to be included, fill it in on the form and we will

purchase group rate tickets. Veterans can get a cheaper rate but MUST purchase on your own with qualified ID, we

cannot purchase them for you.


Page 2


Sons of The

American Legion


The National Organization will again this year rent two buses to transport individuals to and from the wreath

laying ceremonies. In an effort to fully take advantage of this we will be taking requests for seats on the buses with the

wreath order. It is very important, if you reserve a seat that you be in attendance and if you cannot, please contact

Thomas Deal ASAP (Cell # 443-206-0402).


We will also again this year order box lunches for on the bus “it is highly recommended that individuals take

advantage of this as it is a long period to go without eating.” The cost will be $9.00 each - you will have a choice of

turkey, ham or roast beef. Payment and choice will be needed along with the wreath order.

Everyone who wishes to attend MUST fill out a form and submit, National does not reserve for anyone.

If you need further information or have questions, I can be contacted by phone during the day at 443-206-0402

or by email tom.deal@verizon.net

************************************************************************************************

WREATH & LUNCH ORDER FORM - WASHINGTON CONFERENCE WREATH LAYING


on SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26, 2023

Deadline for submissions to be received is February 4, 2023


DETACHMENT ______________________________ CONTACT NAME __________________________________

ADDRESS_____________________________________________________________________________________

CELL PHONE # ________________________________ E-MAIL ________________________________________

Wreath Request ($150) – (Name of Detachment) ___________________________________ Total $___________

Box Lunch ($9.00 each) Turkey # ______ Ham # _______ Roast Beef # _______ X $9.00 Total $________

Arlington National Cemetery General Admission Group Rate


Total Arlington tickets ____ x $13.95 each Total $________

Total Paid for Wreath, Lunch and Arlington Tram: Total enclosed $_____________

Number of Seats Requested for Bus - # ______

Name of others attending and Cell # (Please fill out completely to allow for better communication) -

Name _________________________________________ Cell # _____________________________________

Name _________________________________________ Cell # _____________________________________

Name _________________________________________ Cell # _____________________________________

Name _________________________________________ Cell # _____________________________________

PAYMENT MUST BE ENCLOSED. ORDER WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED WITHOUT PAYMENT!!!

Make check payable to: Thomas Deal and mail to: Thomas Deal, 1434 Clayton St., Perryville, Md. 21903

National Legislative Division Weekly

2023 American Legion Washington Conference


Sons of The American Legion Memorial Wreath Laying Schedule


Meet at: Washington Hilton Hotel

1919 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington DC, 20009

At 9:00 AM receive Tickets for Lunch, Bus seat, Tram tickets by Detachment

At 9:00 am SAL National Commander Chris Carlton will address attendees.

Pictures of Wreaths with SAL National Commander Chris Carlton can be taken between

9:15 and 9:30 am.

Board Busses and load Wreaths at 9:30 am

Depart: Bus will leave from lower level of hotel promptly at 9:30 am, Sunday February 26,

2023

Leave Washington Hilton at 9:30 am

Arrive at Arlington National Cemetery at 9:50 am

1. Tour of Tomb Guards Quarters if available

2. Group photograph of all participants

3. Prayer by National Chaplain

4. Wreath laying Ceremony at the Tomb of The Unknown Soldier 11:15 am

5. Depart the Arlington National Cemetery at 12:30 pm

Arrive at Vietnam Wall Memorial at 12:45 pm

1. Lunch

2. Group photograph of all participants

3. Wreath laying ceremony by National Commander at the Vietnam Wall Memorial with prayer by

National Chaplain

1. Depart the Vietnam Wall Memorial at 2:00 pm


Arrive at the World War II Memorial at 2:30 pm

1. Group photograph of all participants with Detachment wreath placement with National

Commander

2. Wreath laying ceremony by National Commander at the WWII Memorial with prayer by National

Chaplain

3. Depart the World War II Memorial at 3:30 pm


Arrival: Washington Hilton Hotel, 1919 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington DC, 20009 @4:00 pm



December 2, 2022

CONGRESS


Negotiations are underway for an FY23 omnibus spending bill. Both Democrats and Republicans appear to

be proposing a budget of about $1.65 trillion. They have yet to agree on how to divide that money, with

Republicans wanting to spend more on Defense and Democrats, as usual, hoping to put more money into

nondefense domestic programs. It is unlikely Congress will meet the December 16 end of the current

continuing resolution (CR), though. It remains to be seen how long the next CR will need to be. While a

few lawmakers are pushing for pushing the deadline to next year, most are hoping to finish the omnibus

this month.

Senate Minority Whip Sen. Thune (R-SD) told Politico, on Monday, he gives lawmakers an even chance

of completing the omnibus by the end of the year. SAC Ranking Member Sen. Shelby (R-AL) has been

speaking with Leahy, but says “serious negotiations” will not occur until after the Georgia run-off election,

on December 6, between Sen. Warnock (D-GA) and Republican opponent Herschel Walker.

There is talk in some circles of a full-year CR, which would keep federal funding and authorizations at

FY22 levels. Defense Secretary Austin has sent a letter to Congress detailing just how bad this would be

for the Department of Defense (DoD). In the letter, he notes that DoD would, among other problems, be

unable to implement the new National Defense Strategy (NDS).

It is looking more and more likely that, once again, Congress will be in session at least until Christmas (they

could potentially return for a few days after Christmas, as the current Congress runs until the end of the

year). Politico reports that even many Republican Senators do not want to rely upon a majority-GOP House

in 2023 to complete the omnibus.

On Wednesday, Democrats overwhelmingly elected Rep. Jeffries (D-NY) to be the next Minority Leader.

He becomes the first Black person to lead either Party in Congress, and the first to be born after World War

II, ushering in a “younger generation” of leadership.

Wednesday afternoon, the Senate confirmed Robert Phillip Storch to be Inspector General for the

Department of Defense. He becomes the first Senate-confirmed DoD IG in seven years. Only Sen. Braun

(R-IN), Sen. Cotton (R-AR), and Sen. Hawley (R-MO) voted against the nominee.

Rep. McEachin (D-VA) died Monday, after winning a fourth term in the House. Virginia will hold a special

election at a date to be determined by the Governor. McEachin’s district is heavily Democratic, so this seat

is unlikely to flip in the special election.

The House Rules Committee will meet on Monday about several pieces of legislation, including HR 7946,

the Veteran Service Recognition Act of 2022. This legislation, primarily sponsored by House Veterans

Affairs Committee chair Rep. Takano (D-CA), would have DoD, VA, and the Department of Homeland

Security study noncitizen veterans and former members of the Armed Forces who were removed from the

US since January 1, 1990. The Departments would also have to improve information collection and tracking


National Legislative Division Weekly


December 2, 2022


of these individuals. The legislation also calls on DHS to create a program of citizenship through military

service. The bill will likely see action on the House floor sometime next week.

On Thursday, the House passed five veteran-related bills, including the DOULA for VA Act of 2022 (HR

2521), the Mark O’Brien VA Clothing Allowance Improvement Act (HR 4601), and the Long-Term Care

Veterans Choice Act (HR 7158).

LEGION-SUPPORTED LEGISLATION CAPPING FEES

FOR LAWYERS REPRESENTING CAMP LEJEUNE


MARINES INTRODUCED


Senator Sullivan (R-AK) introduces legislation to cap fees for lawyers representing Camp Lejeune marines.

On Nov. 17, U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK) introduced American Legion-supported legislation that would

cap the fees trial lawyers can charge in cases representing sick Marines and other individuals impacted by

water contamination at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. Less than two weeks later, on

Nov. 30, Sullivan made a motion for unanimous consent for his newly introduced bill. S. 5130, the Protect

Camp Lejeune Victims Ensnared by Trial-lawyers’ Scams (VETS) Act, amends the Camp Lejeune Justice

Act and caps legal fees at a maximum of 10% and ensures that attorneys are not paid before a veteran or

family member as a result of any award made.

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act became law in August in the larger Honoring our Promise to Address

Comprehensive Toxics (PACT) Act.


National Legislative Division Weekly


December 2, 2022


“U.S. Marines and their families are being preyed upon by unscrupulous trial lawyers,” said Sullivan,

Alaska’s former attorney general and currently a colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. “They’re

grabbing all the money, and the sick Marines and their families aren’t getting it. (They’re) using sick

Marines to get rich. That’s what my bill’s going to change.”

Sullivan, a member of American Legion Post 28 in Anchorage, called for unanimous consent for the

legislation and cited specific American Legion support for it. He quoted directly from Resolution 15:

Oversight of Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which was passed by The American Legion National Executive

Committee during its 2022 Fall Meetings, reading, “Whereas, predatory law firms charging exorbitant

fees have engaged in aggressive marketing campaigns ... The American Legion urges Congress to

provide the necessary oversight during the implementation of the Camp Lejeune Justice Act to ensure

veterans receive fair consideration of their lawsuits and protections against predatory law firms.”

In a press release issued prior to Sullivan’s remarks, Chanin Nuntavong – executive director of government

affairs for The American Legion – also expressed the organization’s support for the bill. “With the passage

of the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, veterans and their families were finally able to pursue legal action against

the government for their exposure to toxic contaminated water at Camp Lejeune,” he said. “After decades

of waiting, and suffering the realities of life-threatening medical conditions, they were bombarded by

advertisements from unscrupulous law firms charging exorbitant fees. We commend Sen. Sullivan for

correcting this injustice by introducing legislation that caps legal fees at a reasonable amount to ensure our

veterans and their families are not taken advantage of.”


The American Legion submitted congressional testimony to the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee in mid-

November during a hearing on PACT Act oversight that called for the capping of legal fees on Camp


Lejeune Justice Act cases.

Last month, The American Legion submitted a statement for the record (SFR) to the Senate Veterans’

Affairs Committee (SVAC) on this issue. Click here to view it.


NATIVE AMERICAN VETERANS


Sen. Tester (D-MT), on Wednesday, held a hearing in the Veterans Affairs Committee focused on Native

American veterans. He is particularly upset over the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) delays in

implementing a provision to waive copayments for VA health care for these veterans. VA officials assured

him the provision will be implemented by the end of this year. The final regulations might also make the

provision retroactive. This means that Native American veterans would receive refunds for any copayments

made during 2022. The officials said that is not yet a done deal, but they are trying to make it happen.

The next afternoon, VA Secretary McDonough told reporters “we’re working it very, very aggressively,”

and he is committed to getting it done before the end of the year. He acknowledged that the VA is late in

implementing these regulations. McDonough would not comment on whether the rule would be made

retroactive, with veterans receiving rebates.


National Legislative Division Weekly


December 2, 2022


Native American witnesses repeatedly emphasized the importance of building more partnerships and

collaborations between the VA and the Indian Health Service. This would not only bring care closer to

where the veterans live, but also allow for care to be provided in more culturally competent settings.


LEGIONNAIRE OF THE WEEK


In an effort to recognize the weekly accomplishments of our Legionnaires, we will spotlight an individual

every week. These individuals demonstrate exceptional grassroots activism by meeting with/contacting

their Congressional Representative/Senator to advocate for veterans. Efforts like these truly make a

difference and give veterans a voice in Congress.

Daniel Burks, Oregon

This week, we are excited to recognize Daniel Burks from the Department of Oregon for meeting with Rep.

Cliff Bentz (R-OR) at the Veterans Memorial in Ontario, Oregon. The Congressman held an open forum

with local veterans pertaining to a variety of different issues surrounding veterans up to and including the

reasoning behind his voting against the PACT Act.

Thank you, Mr. Burks!

If you have made a grassroots effort and would like to be considered for next week’s “Legionnaire of the

Week,” please fill out the Congressional Contact Report Form here. You can also email me at

kisaacson@legion.org.


UPCOMING HEARINGS


• On Monday, December 5, the House Rules Committee will hold a hearing to consider several bills,

including H.R. 7946 – the Veteran Service Recognition Act.

• On Tuesday, December 6, the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

will hold a hearing titled “Transitional Housing Reform: Examining the Future of the VA Grant and

Per Diem Program.”

• On Wednesday, December 7, the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee will hold a hearing titled

“Fulfilling our Pact: Ensuring Effective Implementation of Toxic Exposure Legislation.”


VOTE TODAY 11-8-2022


TELL CONGRESS: PASS THE AFGHAN ADJUSTMENT ACT

In the summer of 2021, our soldiers and Marines heroically evacuated tens of thousands of Afghan allies

who fought with us against the Taliban. Now it's time for Congress to honor this nation's promise to our

Afghan allies with real and lasting safety through the bipartisan Afghan Adjustment Act.

Since July 2021, more than 70,000 at-risk Afghans have been relocated to the United States and have

entered on what is called, “humanitarian parole” - allowing them to temporarily stay and work in the U.S.

for up to two years. Despite fleeing from the Taliban, there is currently no direct pathway for lawful

permanent residency and stability in the U.S. for most of our new Afghan neighbors. Without an adjustment

act that creates this path, most Afghans would be forced to navigate the backlogged, complex and

paperwork-intensive asylum process. Access to qualified and affordable legal representation, loss of critical

documentation and required evidence during the hurried evacuation, the impact of trauma, and backlogs in

processing create significant barriers that make the immigration process seem insurmountable.

The only viable pathway to protection for Afghans is the passage of the recently introduced Afghan

Adjustment Act (H.R.8685/S.4787) which would provide our new Afghan neighbors with access to a

more streamlined and efficient lawful permanent residency process.

This legislation echoes adjustment acts that Congress historically passed for every other generation

of U.S. wartime evacuees.

Act Now! Tell Congress they MUST pass this critical legislation and ensure that this country keeps its

promise to those who served our country's military.


TAKE ACTION NOW

LEGION INKS MOU ON CAMP LEJEUNE JUSTICE ACT

The American Legion and Bergmann & Moore have entered into a memorandum of understanding which

the legal firm that provides veterans benefits consultation for accredited Legion service officers can help

potential plaintiffs understand the Camp Lejeune Justice Act (CLJA).

The Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring Our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics Act of

2022 – better known as the PACT Act, signed into law Aug. 10, 2022 – opens the door for certain

individuals to file lawsuits and collect damages from the federal government due to their exposure to

contaminated water on the Marine Corps base. Qualified claimants had to have served at least 30 days at

Camp Lejeune, N.C., between Aug. 1, 1953, and Dec. 31, 1987.

National Legislative Division Weekly


November 4, 2022


“Our goal is to make sure veterans and their family members do not settle for less than they deserve and

that they have accurate information about the effect a settlement under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act could

have on their VA disability benefits (and any other federal benefits),” a dedicated website for American

Legion members states.

Bergmann & Moore, founded in 2004 by former VA employees, has been providing American Legion

service officer training and legal consultation since 2017.

The dedicated website – http://www.camplejeunelitigationteam.com/al/ – provides a secure online form for

Legionnaires and their family members to explain their circumstances. The firm also has a 24-hour phone

number – 800-898-9450 – for those who do not wish to use the web platform.

Bergmann & Moore, according to the MOU, “will work in concert with a mass tort law firm as co-counsel

to advocate on the claimant’s behalf” once eligibility under the CLJA is determined.

The stated purpose of the MOU has four prongs:

- Create, implement and execute a service project for veterans interested in participating in the PACT

Act/CLJA litigation

- Protect Legion members and their families through comprehensive education, advocacy and assistance

in determining whether a claim under the CLJA would be beneficial to them when compared with filing for

and receiving benefits from programs administered by VA

- Ensure Legion members receive the maximum benefits allowed under the law while protecting against

predatory and/or unscrupulous actors

- Prevent Legion members from accepting/receiving a one-time benefit under the CLJA to the detriment

of greater, future VA program eligibility and entitlement

Multiple forms of cancer are among no fewer than 15 health conditions or medical events that may have

been caused by contamination. Claimants may be veterans, their families, civilian contractors or estates of

those who were harmed.

Veterans, family members and others potentially affected by contaminated water at Camp Lejeune are

encouraged to consult American Legion accredited service officers about the lawsuit and or any other

matters related to the PACT Act, which extends historic VA disability benefits relief for millions of veterans

exposed to toxic contamination, from atomic cleanup sites to burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Visit legion.org and click on FIND A SERVICE OFFICER to reach an accredited advocate, by ZIP code.


National Legislative Division Weekly


November 4, 2022

CONGRESS


Both the House and the Senate remain on recess, as the country heads into midterm elections next Tuesday.

Early voting is well underway across the country, and polls report breathlessly on close races. At this

writing, it appears Republicans will likely gain the majority in the House, and the margin will remain

extremely narrow in the Senate (with who will be in control a toss-up).


In the meantime, the federal government stays open under a continuing resolution (CR) that expires mid-

December. Democrats in both the House and the Senate want to pass a full FY23 budget during the lame


duck session, as well as the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). However, if Republicans will be

in the majority come January, they may try to pass another CR in order to have control of writing the full

year budget.

THE APPLICATION FOR THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE


COUNCIL IS NOW OPEN


With the midterm elections a month away, The American Legion is beginning the process of rebuilding its

National Legislative Council for the 118th Congress. Interested candidates may submit their applications at

this webpage for their departments’ consideration. Legionnaires are encouraged to submit their

applications before the Nov. 8 election. Thank you to those who have already applied!

The National Legislative Council (NLC) is a 535-member group designated to serve as direct liaisons to

every member of the U.S. Congress. Approved in Resolution 45 by the National Executive Committee in

1975, the council’s aim is to “propagate an interest in a furtherance of the legislative goals of The American

Legion and to serve as a medium for disseminating information and developing an understanding with our

elected representatives.” Learn more about the council in this story.

Members of the NLC are relied on to reinforce The American Legion's overall legislative efforts,

particularly at times when immediate and personal contact with lawmakers is necessary – typically referred

to as “grassroots contact.”

They routinely email, write, and/or call lawmakers and their staff regarding veterans legislation. Members

should strive to visit the lawmaker’s local office at least once per month to discuss issues that will directly

impact The American Legion’s legislative goals.

Members work to:

• Promote an interest in and a furtherance of The American Legion’s legislative goals.

• Serve as a liaison for disseminating information to elected lawmakers and staff.

• Develop and maintain strong working relationships with elected lawmakers and staff.


National Legislative Division Weekly


November 4, 2022


• Disseminate information on proposed and adopted veterans legislation to posts and members of

the Legion within the congressional district.

Position requirements include:

• Current member of The American Legion

• Experience working with public relations and/or elected officials is a plus.

• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are necessary.

• Comfortable speaking and making presentations to larger groups.

• Ability to use social media.

• Ability to represent The American Legion and veterans to various groups and organizations.

• Ownership of an email account and internet access is required.

• Personal relationship with the member of Congress to whom they are assigned, senior staffers in

their office, or willingness and ability to establish relationships with them.

LEGIONNAIRE OF THE WEEK


In an effort to recognize the weekly accomplishments of our Legionnaires, we will spotlight an individual

every week. These individuals demonstrate exceptional grassroots activism by meeting with/contacting

their Congressional Representative/Senator to advocate for veterans. Efforts like these truly make a

difference and give veterans a voice in Congress.

Augustine Galaviz, California

This week, we are excited to recognize Augustine Galaviz from the Department of California for meeting

with Rep. Napolitano (D-CA) in Azusa, California. Mr. Galaviz and Rep. Napolitano discussed local

veteran homelessness and women veterans with children. They also discussed how veteran service

organizations (VSOs), such as The American Legion, can work with local governments to better assist

veterans in need.

Thank you, Mr. Galaviz!

If you have made a grassroots effort and would like to be considered for next week’s “Legionnaire of the

Week,” please fill out the Congressional Contact Report Form here. You can also email me at

kisaacson@legion.org.


UPCOMING HEARINGS


Congress is out of session next week; there will be no hearings.National Legislative Division Weekly


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 28, 2022


TELL CONGRESS: PASS THE AFGHAN ADJUSTMENT


ACT


In the summer of 2021, our soldiers and Marines heroically evacuated tens of thousands of Afghan allies

who fought with us against the Taliban. Now it's time for Congress to honor this nation's promise to our

Afghan allies with real and lasting safety through the bipartisan Afghan Adjustment Act.

Since July 2021, more than 70,000 at-risk Afghans have been relocated to the United States and have

entered on what is called, “humanitarian parole” - allowing them to temporarily stay and work in the U.S.

for up to two years. Despite fleeing from the Taliban, there is currently no direct pathway for lawful

permanent residency and stability in the U.S. for most of our new Afghan neighbors. Without an adjustment

act that creates this path, most Afghans would be forced to navigate the backlogged, complex and

paperwork-intensive asylum process. Access to qualified and affordable legal representation, loss of critical

documentation and required evidence during the hurried evacuation, the impact of trauma, and backlogs in

processing create significant barriers that make the immigration process seem insurmountable.

The only viable pathway to protection for Afghans is the passage of the recently introduced Afghan

Adjustment Act (H.R.8685/S.4787) which would provide our new Afghan neighbors with access to a

more streamlined and efficient lawful permanent residency process.

This legislation echoes adjustment acts that Congress historically passed for every other generation

of U.S. wartime evacuees.

Act Now! Tell Congress they MUST pass this critical legislation and ensure that this country keeps its

promise to those who served our country's military.


TAKE ACTION NOW


GOP CRITIC OF VISA PROGRAM FOR AFGHANS HAS

VETERANS GROUPS FRETTING OVER ITS FUTURE

The original Stars and Stripes article, written by JP Lawrence, is here.

A Republican senator’s latest moves against a program that provides visas to interpreters who worked with

U.S. forces in Afghanistan could spell doom for it, some advocates and aides say.

Lawmakers this week are debating a provision in the annual defense budget that would extend the Special

Immigrant Visa program beyond 2023.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 28, 2022


Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) has raised objections that could kill the program, Jeff Phaneuf, advocacy chief

at the Virginia-based nonprofit No One Left Behind, said in a statement Wednesday.

“Ensuring the continuation of this program is critical to keep our promise to those who stood shoulder to

shoulder with U.S. troops on the battlefield,” Phaneuf said, adding that thousands of translators remain in

Afghanistan and are seeking the visas.

The Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program resettles translators and their family members who face risks

to their lives because of their previous work with the U.S. Currently, anyone who applies by Dec. 31, 2023,

will be considered.

A spokesman for Grassley declined to comment on the senator's position but said the matter is part of

ongoing negotiations, in which various lawmakers have concerns.

"It seems there are a number of objections, from both the House and Senate minority," George Hartmann,

deputy communications director Grassley, said in an email Wednesday.

Grassley is the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over the SIV

program. He has objected to it in the past and tried repeatedly to limit its scope, The Daily Beast reported

in 2018.

He has taken issue with what he considers “lax standards” in the program and has sought to include

stipulations that only Afghans who were classified as a translator or interpreter can apply for an SIV,

according to The Daily Beast.

Grassley represents a “significant hurdle” to the program’s survival, said a congressional staffer who is

familiar with the negotiations but is not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

“Barring something rather extraordinary, the provision probably doesn't get included and the SIV program

would effectively stop at the end of 2023,” the staffer told Stars and Stripes on Wednesday.

But the program has survived previous objections by Grassley, noted Lawrence Montreuil,

Legislative Director at The American Legion. He downplayed the foreboding expressed by the

congressional staffer.

“We're frustrated by his opposition, but we're not overly concerned that Sen. Grassley will succeed,”

Montreuil said Wednesday, adding that if the program ends up in a dire predicament, The American

Legion and other groups will lobby for it.

The U.S. welcomed some 74,000 Afghans after the fall of the American-backed government to the Taliban

in August 2021. About half of them are eligible for SIVs or have applied, a senior administration official

said in 2022.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 28, 2022


The SIV program has seen case delays lasting years because of understaffing and a reliance on outdated

technology, a State Department inspector general report in 2020 said.

The debate comes amid advocacy for another bill, the Afghan Adjustment Act, which provides permanent

legal status to Afghans outside the SIV program or the asylum system.

The bill faces opposition by some Republicans, who say the security procedures in it are not stringent

enough.


CONGRESS


Both the House and the Senate remain in recess.

Reports emerged this week of quiet talks already underway for Congress to raise the debt ceiling during the

lame duck session in November and December. The Republicans are widely expected to gain the majority

in the House (if not also the Senate). GOP leaders are sure to use the need to raise the debt ceiling to force

the Biden Administration to agree to major spending reforms, most likely in Medicare and Social Security.

Raising the debt ceiling during the lame duck session would remove that threat for at least another year.

Some news outlets are reporting there is already some bipartisan support for doing this in the Senate, where

at least 10 Republicans would have to join all of the Democrats to pass such a measure. Last time around,

in December 2021, 14 Republicans voted in favor of raising the debt limit.

Early voting has already begun for the midterm elections around the country but, of course, no winners are

clear yet.

THE APPLICATION FOR THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE


COUNCIL IS NOW OPEN


With the midterm elections a month away, The American Legion is beginning the process of rebuilding its

National Legislative Council for the 118th Congress. Interested candidates may submit their applications at

this webpage for their departments’ consideration. Legionnaires are encouraged to submit their

applications before the Nov. 8 election. Thank you to those who have already applied!

The National Legislative Council (NLC) is a 535-member group designated to serve as direct liaisons to

every member of the U.S. Congress. Approved in Resolution 45 by the National Executive Committee in

1975, the council’s aim is to “propagate an interest in a furtherance of the legislative goals of The American

Legion and to serve as a medium for disseminating information and developing an understanding with our

elected representatives.” Learn more about the council in this story.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 28, 2022


Members of the NLC are relied on to reinforce The American Legion's overall legislative efforts,

particularly at times when immediate and personal contact with lawmakers is necessary – typically referred

to as “grassroots contact.”

They routinely email, write, and/or call lawmakers and their staff regarding veterans legislation. Members

should strive to visit the lawmaker’s local office at least once per month to discuss issues that will directly

impact The American Legion’s legislative goals.

Members work to:

• Promote an interest in and a furtherance of The American Legion’s legislative goals.

• Serve as a liaison for disseminating information to elected lawmakers and staff.

• Develop and maintain strong working relationships with elected lawmakers and staff.

• Disseminate information on proposed and adopted veterans legislation to posts and members of

the Legion within the congressional district.

Position requirements include:

• Current member of The American Legion

• Experience working with public relations and/or elected officials is a plus.

• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are necessary.

• Comfortable speaking and making presentations to larger groups.

• Ability to use social media.

• Ability to represent The American Legion and veterans to various groups and organizations.

• Ownership of an email account and internet access is required.

• Personal relationship with the member of Congress to whom they are assigned, senior staffers in

their office, or willingness and ability to establish relationships with them.

LEGIONNAIRE OF THE WEEK


In an effort to recognize the weekly accomplishments of our Legionnaires, we will spotlight an individual

every week. These individuals demonstrate exceptional grassroots activism by meeting with/contacting

their Congressional Representative/Senator to advocate for veterans. Efforts like these truly make a

difference and give veterans a voice in Congress.

Kelli Harmon, North Carolina

This week, we are excited to recognize Kelli Harmon from the Department of North Carolina for meeting

with Rep. Murphy (R-NC) in Outer Banks, North Carolina. Ms. Harmon and Rep. Murphy discussed the

Fiscal Year 2023 National Defense Authorization Act (FY23 NDAA) and opening VA to all World War II

veterans. Ms. Harmon said that Rep. Murphy agreed to support and sent additional information to his

legislative staff.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 28, 2022


Thank you, Ms. Harmon!

If you have made a grassroots effort and would like to be considered for next week’s “Legionnaire of the

Week,” please fill out the Congressional Contact Report Form here. You can also email me at

kisaacson@legion.org.


UPCOMING HEARINGS


Congress is out of session next week; there will be no hearings.October 14, 2022


SUPPORT OUR DISABLED VETERANS BY PASSING THE


MAJOR RICHARD STAR ACT


Right now, VA deducts the retirement pay of veterans with a disability rating of less than 50%. These

veterans who have been forced into medical retirement are being penalized for their injuries, and there is

no excuse for it. Disability compensation and retirement pay are two different payments, and should be

treated as such. DoD awards retirement pay for honorable service, while the VA is responsible for disability

compensation. Conflating the two and forcing deductions in retirement pay is an injustice.

The American Legion stands with disabled veterans and urges Congress not to continue this denial of

retirement benefits. The Major Richard Star Act would repeal this draconian offset for those veterans who

are medically retired due to injuries sustained in combat and allow them to receive both their retirement pay

without forfeiting their disability compensation.


TAKE ACTION NOW!

CONGRESS


The House was not in session this week, and will not return until after the November elections.

The Senate returned for one day this week in order to start the process for floor consideration of the FY23

National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Armed Services Committee chair Sen. Reed (D-RI) and

ranking member Sen. Inhofe (R-OK) brought the bill to the floor, and immediately adopted a 75-amendment

managers package.

In recognition of the tight legislative calendar once the full Senate returns in November, Reed and Inhofe

have accepted a wide array of non-Defense pieces of legislation, including six authorization bills from other

committees. This includes reauthorization of the Coast Guard and technical changes to the Honoring Our

Pact Act.

When the Senate returns on November 14, lawmakers will have to plow through over 900 remaining

amendments. On the personnel side of the bill, many GOP Senators continue to submit provisions to ensure

that service members who are separated from the military due to a refusal to take the COVID-19 vaccine

not only receive an honorable discharge but also have nothing negative in their separation paperwork. One

amendment would prevent the military from separating anyone for this reason until the Services once again

meet their authorized end strengths.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 14, 2022

SENATE FY23 NDAA


Earlier this week, Senate Armed Services Committee chair Sen. Reed (D-RI) and Sen. Inhofe (R-OK)

officially introduced the FY23 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for floor action.

However, the only thing that happened to the bill immediately was the inclusion of 75 amendments as part

of the manager’s package. The Senate immediately returned to recess mode, and will be back in session

after the elections in November. Senate Majority Leader Schumer (D-NY) has previously announced that

the next votes will occur on November 14, in the evening.

As a result of the amendments, the Department of Defense will have until October 1, 2024, to designate

four military treatment facilities (MTFs) as Core Casualty Receiving Facilities. These hospitals will

maintain the medical capability and capacity required to diagnose, treat, and rehabilitate a large volume of

combat casualties. They will provide a medical response to natural disasters, mass casualty events, and

other national emergencies. The Services are to maintain staffing at these hospitals at no less than 90% of

requirements, although they can augment with civilian personnel as needed.

Service member pay and benefits also received attention. One amendment increases reimbursement of

service members’ transportation of pets making permanent change of station (PCS) moves overseas. This

was a particularly thorny issue during the last PCS season. Another amendment requires the Department of

Defense (DoD) to review dislocation and relocation allowances.

Another amendment makes technical corrections to the Honoring Our PACT Act, which was signed into

law last August. That legislation expands access to care and benefits from the Department of Veterans

Affairs (VA) for toxic-exposed veterans.

When the Senate returns in November, they will have only a few weeks before this session of Congress

ends. It is likely that only the NDAA and either an omnibus spending bill for FY23 or another continuing

resolution will pass. As a result, Reed is allowing the inclusion of many provisions that have nothing to do

with the NDAA’s traditional purview. This includes reauthorization of the Coast Guard Act and inclusion

of the International Pandemic Preparedness and COVID-19 response Act of 2022.

However, over 900 amendments submitted by lawmakers to the NDAA still await attention. The table below

highlights those related to health care and personnel issues. Many (probably the majority) will not see

further action.

The table below lists amendments The American Legion supports. It also indicates the section within the

NDAA where the sponsoring legislator thinks the provision belongs.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 14, 2022


Senator # & Sec Amendment Purpose

Menendez

(D-NJ)


#5963:

Sec. 1077


Make all World War II veterans eligible for VA care.


Kelly

(D-AZ)


#6226:

Sec. 589


Authorization for award of medal of honor to E. Royce Williams for acts of

valor during the Korean war.


Tester

(D-MT)


#6075:

Sec. 632


Provides for disability retirees with fewer than 20 years of military service

to receive both kinds of compensation, without an offset.


Kaine

(D-VA)


#5684:

Sec. 1226


Repeal the 1991 and 2002 Iraq AUMFs.


Hirono

(D-HI)


#6394 VA to establish the Advisory Committee on US Outlying Areas and Freely

Associated States to advise the Secretary on improving care and services for

veterans in those areas.


Ossoff

(D-GA)


#6021 Within 60 days of enactment, the US Archivist is to submit a plan for


eliminating the backlog in VA records requests.


THE APPLICATION FOR THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE


COUNCIL IS NOW OPEN


With the midterm elections a month away, The American Legion is beginning the process of rebuilding its

National Legislative Council for the 118th Congress. Interested candidates may submit their applications at

this webpage for their departments’ consideration. Legionnaires are encouraged to submit their

applications before the Nov. 8 election. Thank you to those who have already applied!

The National Legislative Council (NLC) is a 535-member group designated to serve as direct liaisons to

every member of the U.S. Congress. Approved in Resolution 45 by the National Executive Committee in

1975, the council’s aim is to “propagate an interest in a furtherance of the legislative goals of The American

Legion and to serve as a medium for disseminating information and developing an understanding with our

elected representatives.” Learn more about the council in this story.

Members of the NLC are relied on to reinforce The American Legion's overall legislative efforts,

particularly at times when immediate and personal contact with lawmakers is necessary – typically referred

to as “grassroots contact.”

They routinely email, write, and/or call lawmakers and their staff regarding veterans legislation. Members

should strive to visit the lawmaker’s local office at least once per month to discuss issues that will directly

impact The American Legion’s legislative goals.

Members work to:

• Promote an interest in and a furtherance of The American Legion’s legislative goals.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 14, 2022


• Serve as a liaison for disseminating information to elected lawmakers and staff.

• Develop and maintain strong working relationships with elected lawmakers and staff.

• Disseminate information on proposed and adopted veterans legislation to posts and members of the

Legion within the congressional district.

Position requirements include:

• Current member of The American Legion

• Experience working with public relations and/or elected officials is a plus.

• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are necessary.

• Comfortable speaking and making presentations to larger groups.

• Ability to use social media.

• Ability to represent The American Legion and veterans to various groups and organizations.

• Ownership of an email account and internet access is required.

• Personal relationship with the member of Congress to whom they are assigned, senior staffers in their

office, or willingness and ability to establish relationships with them.

UPCOMING HEARINGS


Congress is out of session next week; there will be no hearings.National Legislative Division Weekly


October 7, 2022


SUPPORT OUR DISABLED VETERANS BY PASSING THE


MAJOR RICHARD STAR ACT


Right now, VA deducts the retirement pay of veterans with a disability rating of less than 50%. These

veterans who have been forced into medical retirement are being penalized for their injuries, and there is

no excuse for it. Disability compensation and retirement pay are two different payments, and should be

treated as such. DoD awards retirement pay for honorable service, while the VA is responsible for disability

compensation. Conflating the two and forcing deductions in retirement pay is an injustice.

The American Legion stands with disabled veterans and urges Congress not to continue this denial of

retirement benefits. The Major Richard Star Act would repeal this draconian offset for those veterans who

are medically retired due to injuries sustained in combat and allow them to receive both their retirement pay

without forfeiting their disability compensation.


TAKE ACTION NOW!

CONGRESS


Both the House and the Senate were out this week. The House does not plan to return until after the

November elections. The Senate, however, could come back in some session as early as next week to start

discussing the FY23 National Defense Authorization Act. Regardless, no votes will occur before November

14, according to Majority Leader Schumer (D-NY).

When they return, lawmakers will need to craft an FY23 omnibus spending bill before the mid-December

expiration of the continuing resolution. That could be complicated by the Treasury Department’s report on

Tuesday that the national debt is $31.1 trillion, a record high. Higher interest rates could drive this number

even higher, on a faster trajectory than previously predicted. Both Medicare and Social Security face

insolvency in the foreseeable future. In addition, health care expenditures in Medicare, Medicaid, the

Department of Veterans Affairs, and other federal programs are rising so quickly they could soon crowd

out all other federal spending. There have been no credible efforts at Congressional reform of major social

net programs in the past decade.


THE AMERICA LEGION PARTICIPATES IN A

ROUNDTABLE WITH CHAIRMAN LEVIN


On Friday, October 7, The American Legion participated in a roundtable with Chairman Levin (D-CA) of

the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity and other VSOs to discuss legislative

priorities, including economic opportunity amendments that could be included in this year’s NDAA.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 7, 2022


Legislative Director Lawrence Montreuil, and Legislative Associate John Kamin, participate in an

economic opportunity roundtable with Chairman Levin (D-CA).

THE AMERICA LEGION ATTENDS TAIWAN’S NATIONAL


DAY CELEBRATION


On Wednesday, October 5, NLD Staff accompanied

Legion National Vice-Commander Paul Kennedy

(PA), DC Executive Director Chanin Nuntavong, and

National Security Director Mario Marquez at the 2022

Taiwan National Day celebration hosted by the

Taiwanese Embassy. Bi-khim Hsiao, Taiwan's

ambassador to the U.S., expressed her gratitude for

President Biden’s defense commitment to Taiwan and

the ever-stronger backing from the U.S. Congress.

According to her, a total of seven congressional trips

involving 28 members have paid visits to the country

this year. Vice-Commander Kennedy reiterated his

gratitude to Ambassador Hsiao for Taiwan’s donation

of 250,000 masks to The American Legion in 2020.


Figure 1American Legion National Vice

Commander Paul Kennedy, DC Executive

Director Chanin Nuntavong, Legislative Associate

Jeff Steele, and National Security Director, Mario

Marquez, attend the 2022 Taiwan National Day.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 7, 2022


THE APPLICATION FOR THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE


COUNCIL IS NOW OPEN


With the midterm elections a month away, The American Legion is beginning the process of rebuilding its

National Legislative Council for the 118th Congress. Interested candidates may submit their applications at

this webpage for their departments’ consideration. Legionnaires are encouraged to submit their

applications before the Nov. 8 election.

The National Legislative Council (NLC) is a 535-member group designated to serve as direct liaisons to

every member of the U.S. Congress. Approved in Resolution 45 by the National Executive Committee in

1975, the council’s aim is to “propagate an interest in a furtherance of the legislative goals of The American

Legion and to serve as a medium for disseminating information and developing an understanding with our

elected representatives.” Learn more about the council in this story.

Members of the NLC are relied on to reinforce The American Legion's overall legislative efforts,

particularly at times when immediate and personal contact with lawmakers is necessary – typically referred

to as “grassroots contact.”

They routinely email, write, and/or call lawmakers and their staff regarding veterans legislation. Members

should strive to visit the lawmaker’s local office at least once per month to discuss issues that will directly

impact The American Legion’s legislative goals.

Members work to:

• Promote an interest in and a furtherance of The American Legion’s legislative goals.

• Serve as a liaison for disseminating information to elected lawmakers and staff.

• Develop and maintain strong working relationships with elected lawmakers and staff.

• Disseminate information on proposed and adopted veterans legislation to posts and members of the

Legion within the congressional district.

Position requirements include:

• Current member of The American Legion

• Experience working with public relations and/or elected officials is a plus.

• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are necessary.

• Comfortable speaking and making presentations to larger groups.

• Ability to use social media.

• Ability to represent The American Legion and veterans to various groups and organizations.

• Ownership of an email account and internet access is required.

• Personal relationship with the member of Congress to whom they are assigned, senior staffers in their

office, or willingness and ability to establish relationships with them.


National Legislative Division Weekly


October 7, 2022


QUARTERLY LEGISLATIVE CHAIRMEN MEETING

The Legislative Commission Chairman Daniel Seehafer convened his final quarterly meeting with members

of the Commission and Vice Chairs of the National Legislative Council before the Fall National Executive

Committee meeting next week. Chairman Seehafer thanked the commission for their advocacy this year,

and briefed them on the rollout for the National Legislative Council rebuild for the 118th Congress. He was

joined by National Legislative Council Chairwoman Liz Hartman, who shared that legislative advocacy is

a valuable component of the recruitment pitch to young and prospective American Legion members.


UPCOMING HEARINGS


Congress is out of session next week; there will be no hearings.

The next conference call for SAL Legislative Commission will be Thursday September 15, 2023 at 7:30 pm eastern time.

 Call in Number: 267-807-9601

Passcode: 988-284-103#National Legislative Division Weekly

National Legislative Division Weekly


September 9, 2022

CONGRESS


The Senate returned from August recess this week and the House is scheduled to return next week. On

Thursday the Senate passes HR 5754, requiring the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to create a system

for veterans to electronically submit complaints about health care they received from the Department. This


legislation passed the House on May 17th with 411 votes in favor and only one against (Rep. Casten (D-

IL)). The President is expected to sign it into law.


Congress is unlikely to pass the approproations bills required to keep the government operating past the

October 1 start of the 2023 fiscal year. Lawmakers are in the midst of negotiating a continuing resolution

(CR)that is expected to be passed later this month. . The CR will likely go until mid-December, when the

lame duck Congress will need to either pass a full budget or yet another CR that lasts into the next session.


NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT (NDAA)

In July, the House of Representatives passed the Fiscal Year 2023 National Defense Authorization Act

(NDAA), which essentially authorizes all Pentagon and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

weapons, salaries and support, and outlines the U.S. national security strategy for the year ahead. This year’s

House-passed version of the bill was more than 1,300 pages long and authorizes more than $850 billion for


spending on defense programs at the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and other defense-

related programs, including about $50 billion for nuclear weapons. A total of 1,220 amendments were


offered to the bill. In the end, the House Rules Committee permitted votes on 650 amendments, mostly of

them in en bloc groups of amendments adopted by voice votes. Among the Legion-supported amendments

adopted were ones that:

• Expands eligibility for Department of Veterans Affairs hospital care, medical services, and nursing

home care to include veterans of World War II who are not already covered.

• Require the Department of Defense to annually report to the House Armed Services Committee the

numbers of noncitizen servicemembers, their immigration status, and the annual naturalization

numbers of those serving.

• Authorize the President to award the Medal of Honor to E. Royce Williams for acts of valor beyond

the call of duty during the Korean War on November 18, 1952, while a member of the US Navy.

• Repeals the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq.

• Repeals the 1991 Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution.

• Repeals the 1957 Authorization for Use of Military Force in the Middle East.

• Expresses the Sense of Congress that Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMFs) should

include a sunset provision.

• Requires the State Department to surge capacity to process Afghan special immigrant visas and P1,

P2 visa applications. "Surge capacity" can include sending additional consular personnel to

embassies and consulates in the region processing Afghan visas.


National Legislative Division Weekly


September 9, 2022


The full Senate has not yet considered its version of the FY23 NDAA bill. On Wednesday, Senate Armed

Services Committee Chair Sen. Reed (D-RI) told reporters he wants to get the FY23 NDAA to the floor

this month. He acknowledged this may be difficult given other priorities such as the CR. The National

Legislative Division is working with Senate offices to offer the above Legion-supported amendments as

part of the Senate version with the aim of keeping as many of them as possible in the final version of the

bill that passes Congress and reaches the president’s desk.


UPCOMING HEARINGS


• On Wednesday, September 14, the House Ways and Means Committee will hold a hearing titled

“The Future of U.S.-Taiwan Trade.”

• On Wednesday September 14, the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee will

hold a hearing to consider the Coast Guard Authorization Act.

• On Wednesday September 14, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will hold a hearing to

consider the Taiwan Policy Act of 2022.

• On Thursday, September 15, the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

will hold a hearing titled “Veteran Readiness and Employment: Is VA Succeeding?”

• On Thursday, September 15, the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee (HVAC) will hold a hearing

titled “Examining women veterans’ access to the full spectrum of medical care, including

reproductive healthcare, through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Health

Administration (VHA).”July 29, 2022

August 27, 2022


The National Legislative Commission met in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 27, 2022, at the Wisconsin

Convention Center. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Daniel Seehafer, of the Department

of Wisconsin. The colors were saluted and a prayer was offered. Roll call of Commission members was

taken.

Chairman Seehafer offered opening remarks and lauded the effort of The American Legion in putting

pressure on the Congress to pass the SFC Heather Robinson PACT Act of 2021, know at the PACT Act.

The Chairman then turned the meeting over to Lawrence Montreuil, the Legislative Director, of The

American Legion.

The Director reviewed the agenda and wins of The American Legion in the 117 th Congress:

 The passage of the SFC Heath Robinson PACT of 2021, which addresses toxic exposure and

burn pits. (H.R. 3967)

 Improving health care for women veterans. Making advance in Mammography and Medical

options (MAMMO) for Veterans Act. (S.2533/H.R.4794)

 Suicide Prevention & Peer Support, Strong Veteran Act of 2022. (H.R.6411.) “Buddy Check

Week” Act. (S.544.)

 Concurrent Receipt. (S.344) Major Richard Star Act.

 Guard and Reserve GI Bill Parity. Guard and Reserve G Bill Parity Act. (H.R.1836.)

 Afghan Adjustment Act (S.4787.)

Jeff Steele, Legislative Associate gave a brief update on S.4787. He also detailed the progress of the

repeal of the Authorization to Use Military Force (AUIMF) still on the books as follows:

 To repeal H.R. 256, 2002 AUMF against Iraq.

 To repeal H.R. 326, to repeal the 1991 Iraq.

 S.J. Res. 10, To repeal the 1991 and 2002 AUMFs against Iraq.

 To repeal the 2002 AUMF H.R. 255.

Citizenship for service: H.R. 7946, Veteran Service Recognition Act of 2022 and S.2265 The Veteran

Visa and Protection Act of 2021.

Katie Isaacson, Legislative Correspondent: Katie reported on the following:

 Military Housing, S.4360/H.R. 8281, The Military Housing Affordability Act of 2022.

 Food Insecurity, in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to improve the Basic Needs

Allowance (BNA).


Adi Thampi, Legislative Associate:

 H.R.8736 – The Governing Unaccredited Representatives Defrauding (GUARD) VA Benefits

Act.

 Concurrent Receipt – The Richard Star Act.

 COVIS-19 pandemic lessons learned – C & P exams and virtual boards.

John Kamin, Legislative Associate and Grassroots Coordinator:

 Guard and Reserve GI Bill Act (H.R. 1836.) This bill would give GI Bill benefits to Guard and

Reserve personnel when activated.

 Homelessness – Building Solutions for Veterans Experiencing Homelessness Act (S.2172).

 VA Home Loan GRACE Act of 2021 (H.R.6124).

 Employment – HUBS for Veterans Act of 2021 (H.R.6335)

 TIER Act (H.R.7891).

 Small Business – Military Spouses Hiring Act (S.3909).

 Veteran Entrepreneurs Act of 2021 (H.R. 5920).

John also reviewed the PSACT Campaign total. New Jersey had 1,110 actions for a 3.27% completion

rate as compared to other departments, against our total membership of 33,958 members.

Also introduced at this meeting was Elizabeth Hartman for the Department of North Carolina, who is the

new Chairman of the National Legislative Council. Lis introduced herself and stated that her goal is

100,000 members to the Action Alert network.

There being no further business before the commission, the meeting was in recess, subject to recall by

the Chairman.

With the mid-term elections growing close, there will be a new Congress taking their respective seats in

Washington. There will be some new faces in congress from New Jersey. After the election, we will

form a new Department Council. There will be more on this soon after the election.


Joseph M. Gugliuzza, PDC

Legislative Chairman, Dept. of New Jersey

Member, National Legislative Commission

Vice Chairman, National Legislative Council for the Dept, of New JerseyPACT ACT DELAY ‘ABSOLUTELY UNACCEPTABLE’